How to Overgrout and Paint Your Brick Fireplace


I get a lot of random DM's about this fireplace right here. I think it's because a lot of people have a fireplace that looked like the before of this (see below). Our house was built in the late 90's and that era loved their basic brick surrounds.


I always like the shape of our fireplace. And, I liked how the previous owners painted it out white. But, I just wanted it to have more impact in the space...but, also a softened texture...


SO...here's how I overgrouted the brick (to soften the look) and painted it black...to give it impact.











Things you need (and again, this isn't everything...but, it's most stuff):

- Grout (we used premade Mapei Premixed Mortar 3.79L was enough for this size fireplace. Also, you could make your own grout to save a few bucks. This was just quick and easier for me at the time.)

- Large Trowel

- Large Bucket of water

- Masonry Piping Bag (If you want to try this method...it didn't work for me...as you will see shortly below)

- Paint - in the black variety. I used Dulux Eggshell, Diamond Interior paint, color matched for Sherwin Williams Tricorn Black.


 

A quick note on our fireplace. Our fireplace is actually a heat providing source for our home. We put in Valor natural gas inserts. They cycle on and off dependant on the tempertaure setting on our home. We have found that this saves us a lot of money heating-wise. There are two fireplaces on the main level of our home...and these two fireplaces do a great job in keeping the open spaces warm. (We have baseboard heating in bedrooms, but, that is pretty much it). This overgrouting and painting method has proved to hold up really well on our fireplaces for the last year and a half. And these fireplaces get HOT...often.

 

The Process in Pictures (I realize now that Instagram was my blog space...but, I needed to create an actual blog space. For me really...and the 4 other people that may read this one day).

So, below is a series of pictures describing how it all went down...


After doing a minimal clean of the fireplace (dusting and a wipe down). I started grouting on Day 2.


The Overgrout Piping Bag Method


The PreMixed Grout

This is like buying pre-made Betty Crocker icing, so you can get at icing that cake and don't have to buy the ingredients and make it.

This is the grout I used... Buy the big pail (like this picture I showed here). What I didn't show are the pictures of the two other smaller buckets I bought. Also, not shown...my annoyed face driving back and forth to Rona to get more premixed mortar. (Three times).






A note on why I wanted to overgrout...


And a further note on how my first method didn't work great.






 

The Overgrout Trowel Method (the method that worked for me)






This was the point where I was like...okay. This fireplace may just work out after all.


I took screenshots of the video I did on IG. If you want to visit the video, you can take a look way down my story highlights...labelled DIY Fireplace. But, even when I rewatched the video. It seemed long.






 

Paint

Part of me wanted to paint the fireplace so the TV just disappeared into the surround. Then that TV would be less noticeable. The other part of me wanted to paint this fireplace so that it would anchor the space...as black accents do. Both were good reasons to just go for it.









I ended up doing 2 coats of Tricorn Black. I kept a paintbrush in a bag in our fridge for far too long after these coats of paint went up. Just for when we would Netflix after the kids went down...and I would notice small spots that I missed. (Note...I didn't use heat specific paint for the brick. Just a high quality interior eggshell paint).


 

So, this whole process took just over 6 days. In the grand scheme of things...it really wasn't that much work (amnesia...I'm sure at the time, there were moments where I was like, why in the AF am I doing this - as any DIY project gets to). But, the overall impact of that black fireplace has been a decision I've been patting myself on the back for one and a half years later.

 
Again...the before and after...




So, would you try this? Hope you found this helpful! Drop me a comment and let me know what you think...

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